European Humanities
EH 31
Spragins
2017-18

 
“Two things fill the mind with ever new and increasing admiration and awe, the more often and steadily we reflect upon them: the starry heavens above me and the moral law within me.”  (Kant)



Carey Hall Room 202
jspragins@gilman.edu
 
(443) 608-8068  

ODD DAYS: First Period

EVEN DAYS: Second Period

4th Period Classes: Days 3,4,7,10

Fall Outline:

Course Description
Orientation 
Texts for 2017-18

 



Nike Adjusting Her Sandal 410 BC.

The Greeks

 

 

  


God Speaks to Job from the Whirlwind (William Blake)

 

Hellenism, Judaism, Christianity and the Roman World

 

 


The Rose Window at Notre Dame Cathedral

 

Medieval England

 

 


Cowper Madonna
c.1505 (Raphael)

 

The Renaissance

 


 

 


Shakespeare’s Macbeth (1606) 

 


Juan de Pareja
1650 (Velazquez)

 

The Seventeenth Century

 



Voltaire, 1778
(Houdon)

 

The Enlightenment

 

Mid-Year Exam











 

Month

Day

  Cycle Day

 Day

Assignment






08/      

30

Day 0

Wed.

MINI-SCEDULE



Bright newborn stars shape a nebula
-- a glowing cloud of dust and gas
-- through their luminous energy,
while the nebula keeps the energy
from dissipating into the galaxy.
Hubble Space Telescope

 
The Big Bang!

Big Bang Briefly

Universe Timelines


Course Orientation: 

Course Description 
Texts for 2017-18
Daily Grammar & Vocabulary Drills (Books in Classroom)

 

The CreationHubble Space Telescope Photos

Powers of Ten  (The Size of the Universe)

Deep Time Exercise:
The History of Deep Time


If every step you take measures a year, how far would you have to walk from Gilman (heading west on Northern Parkway) to get to the following moments in the history of the universe? Where would you wind up?

Extra Credit: At three feet per step and fifteen minutes per mile (5280 feet), how long would it take you to get there? Draw a line graph on the chalkboard to represent the data as close to scale as possible.

a.       Greek Golden Age Begins: 500 BC 

b.      Agricultural Revolution: 10,000 BC 

c.        Ice Age Ends: 18,000 BC 

d.      Cave Art: 50,000 BC 

e.      The Cognitive Revolution: 70,000 BC

f.        Homo sapiens: 250,000 BC 

g.       Homo Erectus: 1, 800,000 BC (1.8 X 10>6)

h.      Lucy (Australopithecus afarensis): 3,200,000 BC  (3.2 X 10>6)

i.         Luca: Life on Earth Begins: 3,500,000,000 BC  (3.5 X 10>9)

j.        Earth Forms: 4,570,000,000 BC (4.57 X 10>9)

k.       Big Bang: 13,700,000,000 BC (13.7 X 10>9)

Conversions; Calculator; Map, The Solar System (map)

Answers


Homework: 






 08     

31

Day 1

Thurs.

Long Assembly





Grammar: Diagnostic Test

Gilman School Computer Network Resources: 

Summer Reading Speeches 

Homework: 






09/ 01 Day 2 Fri.



Mediterranean Colonies



Archaic Greece


Finish Grammar Diagnostic Test

Gaarder, Sophie's World, pp. 1-22 "The Garden of Eden"; "The Top Hat"; (Notes)


The European World According to Herodotus (500 BC)

The Greeks: Backgrounds

Geography Project: Ancient Greece Map 

Use these maps to get ready for a geography quiz.  
Ancient World Maps for Students (UNC) 
Ancient Greece  

PDF Maps: 
Map of Greece (place names)

Homework: 

Ancient Greece Map
Read Gaarder, Sophie's World, pp. 23-29 "The Myths"






09/ 04 Day 0 Mon. LABOR DAY

09/

05

Day 3

Tues.

 



Lascaux Cave, France



Venus of Willendorf
c. 24,000-22,000 BC
(Naturhistorisches Museum, Vienna)


The Great Pyramid of Khufu 2530 BC  Khafre's Pyramid c. 2500 BC   The Pyramid of Menkure c. 2460 B.C.





Due at 3:30 p.m.: Portrait of Self as a Writer

Flipgrid Summer Reading Speeches and Responses

  • Don't read your speech. instead, speak directly to the camera. Use gestures.
    Answer the following questions in your speech:
    • What was the writer trying to accomplish?
    • How did he or she do it?
    • What key moments in the story prove your point?
    • Would you recommend this book to another student?
    • Why? or Why not?
  • Video length: 1 min and 30 secs

The Greeks (Backgrounds):

Homework: 

Powerpoint Projects: 

Neat Resources: 


"Hieroglyphics." 
ca. 300 B.C. London, British Museum.





09/
06
Day 4
Wed.




Minoan Snake Goddess
from Knossos, Crete
c. 1600 BC


Western Ancient History in Twenty Minutes: The Age of Mythology

Powerpoint: Crete, Mycenae, Greece 

Homework:
  • Powerpoint Projects
For further reading
4th Period: 

Man in the State of Nature:






09/

07

Day 5

Thurs.

GILMAN PARENT NIGHT




Death Mask of Agamemnon

(Smarthistory Video)
10 1/8 inch beaten gold
1550 BC

This 3,500-Year-Old Greek Tomb Upended
What We Thought We Knew About
the Roots of Western Civilization

(Smithsonian Jan 2017)



Homeric Geography


Attic, black-figure, ca. 530 B.C.

 

Student Presentations:

Western Ancient History in Twenty Minutes: The Age of Mythology  
Mythology Assignment Table 2017

Homer:

“The Iliad and the Odyssey have been known in the Western world continuously from the time that they were made available.”

Powerpoint: Crete, Mycenae, Greece (Backgrounds to Homer)

Essay Contrasting Achilles and Odysseus due Tuesday, September 13th  at 3:30 p.m.

Homework:

Additional Resources:




 

 

09/

08

Day 6 

Fri.





Lion Gate, Mycenae, c. 1300-1250 B.C.E.
(Smarthistory video)


The Shield of Achilles (1821)
made for George IV’s coronation banquet


Birth of Athena (560 B.C.)


Western Ancient History in Twenty Minutes:  The Age of Mythology 

Paragraph on Mythology
Mythology Assignment Table 2017

Homer (750 B.C.): Introduction to The Iliad

Proem to The Iliad (Listen to The Iliad in Ancient Greek)

Sing, Goddess, sing of the rage of Achilles, son of Peleus—
that murderous anger which condemned Achaeans
to countless agonies and threw many warrior souls
deep into Hades, leaving their dead bodies
carrion food for dogs and birds—
all in fulfillment of the will of Zeus.

Start at the point where Agamemnon, son of Atreus,

that king of men, quarreled with noble Achilles.

Which of the gods incited these two men to fight?

 

(Essay Contrasting Achilles and Odysseus due Tuesday at 3:30 p.m.)

 

Homer, The Iliad, episode one: "The Quarrel by the Ships" (Study Guide) (Quiz)
Paragraph on Achilles as Hero

Homework:

Read Homer, The Odyssey, Book Nine: "Ismarus, the Lotus Eaters, and the Cyclops";  Study Guide; also read the short excerpt from Book 12: Hades where "Odysseus Meets Achilles"

Maps: Odysseus' Journey Home; Odyssey Map


The Sirens

09/
11
Day 7
Mon.


The Cyclops Polyphemus (Sperlanga)

Mythology Assignment Table 2017

Homer, The Odyssey,

Homer Odyssey Book Nine Study Guide

Homework:

For Further Reading: 




ODYSSEUS & POLYPHEMOS;
Attic Black Figure 510 - 490 BC Louvre


Homeric Geography




Odysseus Defying the Cyclops,
drawing Shutzenburger (1894)
Odysseus's Escape
Painted kylix, showing a trireme. 490 B.C.
 (London: British Museum)
Odysseus and his men blinding Polyphemus
(detail of a proto-attic amphora, c. 650 BC, museum of Eleusis)





09/

12

Day 8 

Tues.

 




Head of Odysseus (marble, ca. A.D. 50, from
the "Cave of Tiberius" at Sperlonga).


Statue of Odysseus and Polyphemus
in the Sperlanga Museum



(Essay Contrasting Achilles and Odysseus due at 3:30 p.m.)


Mythology Assignment Table 2017

Peer Review with the Laptop

Introduce: Internet Research Project

The Greek Ideal Essay due Monday, October 16th

Homework:


Greek and Phoenician Trade Routes 

Amazing discovery of 22 shipwrecks off Greece 

offers wondrous glimpse into ancient life 

By Yanan Wang Washington Post October 30 2015






09/

13

Day 9 

Wed.

 




The Nile


Boeotia: Mt. Helikon from Osios Loukas


Discuss: "The Greek Miracle" (Hamilton vs. Kelley)

Mythology Assignment Table 2017

Dr. J.’s Timeline of Classical Greece

Internet Research Project:
Assignment Table 2017

The Greek Ideal Essay due Monday, October 16th

Homework:


The Emergence of Athens:

For further reading:

Check out the Maps:
Battle of Marathon (Map)
Battle of Thermopylae (Another Map
Battle of Salamis (Map)

For further reading:

Dr. J's Illustrated Persian War Site

 






09/

14

Day 10 

Thurs.



The Persian Empire at its Height



Thermopylae Monument


The reconstructed trireme Olympias at sea.

It was launched with due ceremony on 27 June 1987.

A Trireme Bearing Down on You!

Internet Research Project:
Assignment Table 2017

Mythology Assignment Table 2017

The Greek Ideal Essay due Monday, October 17th

Greek Ideal Questions on Homer and Herodotus  

The Emergence of Athens:
Leonidas, Themistocles and The Persian Wars
(490-479 BC)

Clips from 300: "This is Sparta!"; "Earthquake? No Battle Formations!"


The Persian Wars: The Test of Greek Democracy 
Herodotus: The Persian Wars (Quiz)
Leonidas and the 300 at Thermopylae (Mosaic)

Historiē: “research” or “inquiry”; To Herodotus’ audience, the term would have had a vaguely clinical air, coming, as it did, from the vocabulary of the newborn field of natural science. (Herodotus was born in Ionia.) Prior to Herodotus, people conceived of their ‘story’ in epic terms, ie a poem recounting the exploits of a hero, like Achilles in The Iliad. (Notes on The Invention of History)

Homework:

Read: Gaarder, Sophie's World, pp. 28-55: The Natural Philosophers; Democritus; Fate (Study Guide)


Map of the Battle of Thermopylae






09/ 15 Day 1 Fri. Academy of Ideas: The Pre-Socratics


Thales Theorem? 

Cosmos with Neil Degrasse Tyson, Season 1 Episode 6 "Deeper, Deeper, Deeper Still" (17:18 minutes in): Thales and Democritus (Netscape)


Thales of Miletus (624-547 BC)


Anaximander, detail  from Raphael,
The School of Athens (1510)


Internet Research Project:
Assignment Table 2017

The Greek Ideal Essay due Monday, October 17th

Introduction to the Natural Philosophers: Sophie's World, pp.28-55 (quiz) (answers)

Greek Ideal Essay: The Pre-Socratic Philosophers

  • physis vs. nomos: nature vs. custom
  • philosophy:  Greek word, from phileîn, “to love,” and sophía, “wisdom,” 
  • cosmology: the study of the origin, nature, and structure of the physical universe.
  • metaphysics: the study of the nature of reality, including the relationship between mind and matter, substance and attribute, time and space, fact and value.
  • axiom: a sentence or proposition that is not proved or demonstrated and is considered to be self-evident. Therefore, it is taken for granted as true and serves as a starting point for deducing other truths. (How is an axiom different from a theorem?) (Euclid’s Axioms)

Powerpoint Presentations:

Homework: 

Read Plato, Apology (The Trial of Socrates) (Socrates Study Guide)

For further reading:


Tour of Miletus (480 B.C.)  (Notice the gridplan introduced
by the architect Hippodamus a native of Miletus.)

 

 

 

 

 

09/

18

Day 2

Mon.

LONG ASSEMBLY



Pythagoras from Raphael,
The School of Athens (1510)


The Union of Earth and Water
(1618) Reubens




Internet Research Project:
Assignment Table 2017

The Greek Ideal Essay due Monday, October 17th

Introduction to the Natural Philosophers: Sophie's World, pp.28-55 (quiz) (answers)

Paragraph Work: The Pre-Socratic Philosophers

  • Why did philosophy emerge in Ionia during the late 7th century BCE? 
  • What is the relationship between philosophy, economics and democracy?
  • What contrasting cosmologies did the early philosophers develop?
  • How did the materialists (empiricists) (see The Ionian School and Heraclitus) and 
    the idealists (rationalists) (see The Eleatic School with Parmenides and Pythagoras) differ in
    their understanding of the world?
  • How did Empedocles and Democritus try to resolve the conflict between
    the materialists and the idealists?
  • What place did morality and ethics have in their thinking?
  • Use words like skeptic, moral relativism, rhetoric

Homework: 

Read: Gaarder, Sophie's World, pp. 56-77: Socrates, Athens

For further reading:

09/ 19 Day 3 Tues.


 


David, Jacques-Louis
The Death of Socrates 1787



Socrates speaking with Alcibiades,
a detail of The School of Athens,
a fresco by Raphael.  (Wikipedia)



Bust of Socrates (Roman Copy of Lyssipos)


Athens and Sparta during the Peloponnesian Wars

Internet Research Project:
Assignment Table 2017

The Greek Ideal Essay due Monday, October 17th


the life which is unexamined is not worth living” - Socrates

The Greek Ideal Essay

V. The Greek Ideal

  • Why are Socrates, Plato and Aristotle justly regarded as the most important thinkers
    in the history of Western civilization?
  • What was Socrates' great accomplishment?
  • How did Plato and Aristotle interpret Socrates' teachings in two entirely different ways?

Powerpoint Presentation::

The Athenian Golden Age: Discussion of Plato's Apology; Socrates Study Guide (Quiz)

Gaarder, Sophie's World, pp. 56-77: Socrates, Athens

The Peloponnesian War:
Homework:
Compare to Lincoln's Gettysburg Address and   John F. Kennedy's Inaugural Address

For further reading:





09/

20

Day 4 

Wed.





Marble Bust of Pericles British Museum



View of the Acropolis and the South Slope from the southwest (from near the Philopappos Monument).
(Ancient City of Athens)



Athens and Sparta during the Peloponnesian Wars



The names of the 58,209 American soldiers either killed or missing in action during the Vietnam War. As a memorial at Arlington reads: "All gave some . . . some gave all."


Internet Research Project:
Assignment Table 2017

The Greek Ideal Essay due Monday, October 17th

The Greek Ideal in Politics

VI. The Greek Ideal in Politics

  • How were the characteristics of the Greek Ideal reflected in the principles
    of Athenian democracy? (see Pericles' Funeral Oration)
  • What problems can be observed in the application of these ideals to the
    realities of Athenian society?
  • How did Plato criticize Democracy?
Powerpoint Presentations:

Backgrounds:

Discuss the characteristics of Athenian Democracy as reflected in Pericles' speech:

Thucydides Pericles’ Funeral Oration (431 BCE)  (Outline) (Quiz)  (Sprago Notes)

  1. Apology for inadequacy of words
  2. Honor to Ancestors
  3. Thesis
  4. The Characteristics of Democratic Society
  5. The Advantages of a Democracy in War: Citizen Soldiers
  6. The Characteristics of the Citizen in a Democracy
  7. Honor to the Fallen
  8. The Obligation of the Living to the Dead

Homework:

For fiurther reading:





09/ 21 Day 0
Thurs. Rosh Hashanah
09/22Day 5Fri.


 


Bust of a Spartan Warrior: "Our friend brings us good news.
If the Persians darken the sun with their arrows,
we will be able to fight in the shade." (Dieneces)


Peloponnesian Wars



Internet Research Project:
Assignment Table 2017

The Greek Ideal Essay due Monday, October 17th


Sparta: (Quiz)

Homework:

Darker Aspects of The Athenian Golden Age: 

For further reading:
09/
25
Day 6
Mon.

 

 

Map of Ancient Athens and the fortified Long Walls.



The Athenian Empire (450 BCE)



An Athenian Slave Helps an Athlete
Prepare to Compete  510-500 B.C


Internet Research Project:
Assignment Table 2017

The Greek Ideal Essay due Monday, October 17th

"Men do not rest content with parrying the attacks of a superior, but often strike the first blow to prevent the attack being made. And we cannot fix the exact point at which our empire shall stop; we have reached a position in which we must not be content with retaining but must scheme to extend it, for, if we cease to rule others, we are in danger of being ruled ourselves. Nor can you look at inaction from the same point of view as others, unless you are prepared to change your habits and make them like theirs." Alcibiades' Oration before the Sicilian expedition as recorded by Thucydides, (VI, 18]

Darker Aspects of  The Athenian Golden Age: 

Problems with Greek Democracy:

  1. Can democracy compete with authoritarian enemies? (Athens v. Sparta)
  2. Can citizens meet their responsibilities? (voting, community service, military service)
  3. Will the leaders of a democracy be corrupted by moral relativism and power? (Alcibiades' imperialism, Aristotle's justification of economic exploitation;  the us vs. them syndrome)

Homework:

For further reading

09/ 26 Day 7 Tues.


 


Plato (left) and Aristotle (right),
a detail of The School of Athens,
a fresco by Raphael.  (Wikipedia)


Plato’s Cave


Internet Research Project:
Assignment Table 2017

The Greek Ideal Essay due Monday, October 17th


Powerpoint Presentations: Socrates' Students:

Plato and Aristotle:

Homework:

  • Paragraphs on Greek Democracy and The Greek Ideal





Sculpture from Parthenon's East Pediment

(Smarthistory)

 "The Winged Victory of Samothrace"
200-190 BC (Smarthhistory video) (Louvre)






09/

27

Day 8

Wed.

 




Sculpture from the Parthenon's East Pediment

(Smarthistory)



Temple of Hera at Paestum (550 BC)



Temple of Athena at Paestum (500 BC)

(Smarthistory Video)


The Parthenon,
(Ancient City of Athens)


The Parthenon 477-438 BC The Fibonacci Sequence

(Smarthistory)

The Golden Ratio (Khan Academy) The Construction of the Parthenon  (NOVA) 


Internet Research Project:
Assignment Table 2017

The Greek Ideal Essay due Monday, October 17th


Socrates' Students:

The Parthenon embodies the supreme ideal of the Greeks: there is harmony and order in the universe that is discernible to the human intellect. (see Disney Headquarters

Presentations:

Homework:

Backgrounds to Greek Tragedy: 
Review: Bullfinch's Mythology: Dionysus (Bacchus), Cadmus and Europa; The Sphinx

For further reading:

From Ovid, Metamorphoses, Books 3 and 4
The House of Cadmus:
Europa, Acteon, Semele, Tiresias, Narcissus and Echo, Pentheus,
Athamas and Ino

Kouros (youth), ca. 590–580 (Smarthistory video)
Polykleitos, Doryphoros 450-440 (Smarthhistory video) Lacoon and his Sons (2nd c. BCE)

 


09/

28

Day 9

Thurs.





Dionysian Revels


Internet Research Project:
Assignment Table 2017

The Greek Ideal Essay due Monday, October 17th

Powerpoint Presentation: The Origins of Greek Tragedy

Backgrounds to Greek Tragedy:

Homework:

For further reading: 


Titian, Bacchus and Ariadne (1518) (Smarthistory)

 

 

 

 


09/

29

Day 10

Fri.


 

 


The Theatre at Epidauros
from Skenotheke

An Introduction to Greek Theatre (National Theatre)
An Introduction to Greek Tragedy (Natinal Theatre)


 
The Theatre of Dionysus
next to the Acropolis in Athens

 

Internet Research Project:
Assignment Table 2017

The Greek Ideal Essay due Monday, October 17th

The Theme of Tragedy: The Mystery of Human Suffering 

From Bullfinch's Mythology: Dionysus (Bacchus), Cadmus and Europa; The Sphinx; From Ovid, Metamorphoses, Books 3 and 4: The House of Cadmus and the Problem of Undeserved Suffering (Acteon, Semele, Tiresias, Narcissus and Echo, Pentheus, Athamas and Ino)

The Origins of Tragedy:

Homework:

 

For Further Study: 






10/

02

Day 1

 Mon.





Collier, Priestess of Delphi (1891)


Pronomos Vase (c. 400 B.C.)

 

Internet Research Project:
Assignment Table 2017

Sculpture of the Golden Age: The Rise of the Classical Ideal

The Greek Ideal Essay due Monday, October 17th

  • How did Sophocles question the foundation of the Greek ideal in his tragedy Oedipus Rex?
  • What ancient understanding of our place in the natural world resurfaces in the ritual of tragedy?
  • How might Socrates have responded to Sophocles' tragic vision in Oedipus Rex? (No doubt, he saw the play.)

Sophocles, Oedipus Rex (Discussion) Prologue and Parados (Study Guide) (Quiz)

Homework:

(Discussion outline)







10/

03

Day 2

Tues.

 




Teiresias Accuses Oedipus



"You yourself are the pollution of this country."
(Scene 1)

 

Internet Research Project:
Assignment Table 2017

The Greek Ideal Essay due Monday, October 17th

  • How did Sophocles question the foundation of the Greek ideal in
    his tragedy Oedipus Rex?
  • What ancient understanding of our place in the natural world resurfaces
    in the ritual of tragedy?
  • How might Socrates have responded to Sophocles' tragic vision in
    Oedipus Rex? (No doubt, he saw the play.)

Sophocles, Oedipus Rex (Discussion) Prologue and Parados (Study Guide) (Quiz)

Sophocles, Oedipus Rex (Discussion outline) Scene 1 and Ode 1 (Study Guide) (Quiz)

Irony: Dramatic Irony, Perepetea, Catharsis
The Soothsayer's Prophecy

Homework:

 




 

 

10/

04

Day 3

Wed.





 

Internet Research Project:
Assignment Table 2017

The Greek Ideal Essay due Monday, October 17th

  • How did Sophocles question the foundation of the Greek ideal in
    his tragedy Oedipus Rex?
  • What ancient understanding of our place in the natural world resurfaces
    in the ritual of tragedy?
  • How might Socrates have responded to Sophocles' tragic vision in
    Oedipus Rex? (No doubt, he saw the play.)

Sophocles Oedipus Rex: (Discussion outline); Scene 2; Ode 2 (Study Guide) (Quiz) (Jocasta's Entrance)

Irony: Dramatic Irony, Perepetea, Catharsis

Dramatic Irony in Scene 2: Example 1 ; Example 2

Homework

Read Oedipus Rex: 




 

 

10/

05

Day 4

Thurs.

 




"Polybos was not your father." Oedipus Rex iii






 

Internet Research Project:
Assignment Table 2017

The Greek Ideal Essay due Monday, October 17th

Sophocles, Oedipus Rex: 

Scene 3: The Messenger from Corinth

  • Note the relative calm at the outset of the scene: what is Jocasta doing?
  • What "good news" does the messenger bring? 
  • What is strange about Oedipus' reaction to the news? (48-50)
  • How does Jocasta comfort Oedipus when he says that he still fears fulfilling
    the second part of the prophecy- sleeping with his mother.(51) Notice the
    disturbing irony of the moment. 
  • What is Sophocles doing to our notions of right and wrong?
  • Describe Perepeteia #3. (51-54) What makes this moment a classic perepeteia?
  • How does Oedipus learn the origin of his handicap? What did the shepherd who
    saved the infant Oedipus also witness?
  • How does Oedipus understand  Jocasta's disapproval of his search for the identity
    of his true parents? 
  • What does Oedipus mean when he calls himself a child of Luck?

What does the chorus celebrate in Ode III

How is this celebration deeply ironic? 

What does it indicate about the nature of the approaching catharsis?

Scene 4: The Shepherd at the Mystery's Center

A slave, the humblest of Thebans, is brought before great King Oedipus. 

The Moment of Recognition (Anagnoris)

Discussion: The Messenger from Corinth; Recognition

 

Homework:




 

 

10/
06
Day 5
Fri.



 


"God. God. Is there a sorrow greater!"
Oedipus Rex, exodus

 

Internet Research Project:
Assignment Table 2017

The Greek Ideal
Essay due Monday, October 17th

Sophocles Oedipus Rex:
Catharsis :Exodos (Study Guide) (Quiz)

  • How did Sophocles question the foundation of the Greek ideal in
    his tragedy Oedipus Rex?
  • What ancient understanding of our place in the natural world resurfaces
    in the ritual of tragedy?
  • How might Socrates have responded to Sophocles' tragic vision in
    Oedipus Rex? (No doubt, he saw the play.)

Discussion: Catharsis

Aristotle's Definition of Tragedy:

  • tragos: "goatsong"
  • choral odes: dithyrambs (Parados) (Ode 1) (Ode 2) (Ode 3) (Ode 4)
  • "Tragedy, then, is an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude; ... in the form of action, not of narrative; through pity and fear effecting the proper purgation of these emotions."
  • Action (plot) is not merely the sequence of events but "a movement of the spirit through a community."
  • The building blocks of tragedy: dramatic irony and perepeteia lead to catharsis

Homework:



Oedipus Quinn



 

 

10/

09

Day 6

Mon.

 




"terracotta mask of Dionysus" Greek,
Myrina; second century BCE Paris, Louvre Museum.
 

 

Internet Research Project:
Assignment Table 2017

The Greek Ideal Essay due Monday, October 17th

Essay Workshop: The Greek Ideal

Homework:




 

 

10/ 10 Day 7 Tues.


Khnopff, The Caresses (1896)

 

 

Internet Research Project:
Assignment Table 2017

The Greek Ideal Essay due Monday, October 17th

Essay Workshop: The Greek Ideal

Homework:

The Greek Ideal Essay 

MLA Citation Format

10/
11
Day 8

Wed.

 PSAT's

10/

12

Day 9

Thurs.

 



"Oh child of evil,/ To have entered that wretched bed-- the selfsame one!/  More primal than sin itself, this fell to me."
Oedipus Rex, Exodos

 

The Greek Ideal Essay due Monday, October 17th

Internet Research Project:
Assignment Table 2017

Essay Workshop: The Greek Ideal

MLA Citation Format




 

 

10/

13

Day 10

Fri.

 




Diogenes and Alexander the Great


The Greek Ideal Essay due Monday, October 17th

Essay Peer Review with the Laptop

MLA Citation Format

Homework: 

Read Sophie's World, "Hellenism", pp.121-39






10/

16

Day 1

Mon.

 

Alexander Mosaic from Pompeii, from
a 3rd century BC original Greek painting, now lost)

The Regions Conquered by Alexander 
(Mosaic Sources on Alexander the Great)

The Greek Ideal Essay due today at 3:30 p.m.

The Cynics;  Alexander The Great:

Roman Art (Powerpoint

Directions:

  1. Carefully read your texts.
  2. While reading, think about how you will answer the study questions.
  3. Write answers to the questions in sentences.
  4. Report to the class about the main ideas of the reading. (Don’t just tell the story; explain its significance.)
  5. Be ready to lead the class in a discussion of the review questions at the end of your section. 

Homework:






10/

17

Day 2

Tues.

 




Augustus as general, from Primaporta,
Italy, ca. 20 B.C. Marble, 6' 8" high.

Vatican Museums, Rome

A Virtual Reconstruction of Ancient Rome (Smarthistory)

The Pantheon (Smarthistory)

The Ara Pacis (Smarthistory)

The Colloseum  (Smarthistory)

Trajan's Column (Smarthistory)

Equestrian Sculpture of Marcus Aurelius (Smarthistory)

The Colossus of Constantine (Smarthistory)


Roman World ProjectAssignment Table 2015
Roman World Paragraph Test on Wednesday, October 26th 

Roman Art (Powerpoint

Judaism: (Historical Backgrounds)

Directions:

  1. Carefully read your texts.
  2. While reading, think about how you will answer the study questions.
  3. Write answers to the questions in sentences.
  4. Report to the class about the main ideas of the reading. (Don’t just tell the story; explain its significance.)
  5. Be ready to lead the class in a discussion of the review questions at the end of your section.

Homework: Read Sophie's World, "The Postcards" and "Two Cultures" (pp. 140-164)

Judaism:

10/ 18 Day 3 Wed.



God Speaks to Job from the Whirlwind (William Blake) 


The Western Wall of the Temple Mount in Jerusalem


Roman World ProjectAssignment Table 2016
Roman World Paragraph Test on Wednesday, October 26th 

Judaism: (Historical Backgrounds)

  1. How does the ambiguity of the ancient Hebrew myths (like The Garden of Eden, The Flood, and Job teach us about the nature of the covenant between God and his chosen people?
  2. Describe the path to the truth that must be followed according to ancient Hebrew thought.

Homework:

Paragraphs on Judaism


Be ready for Christianity Presentations:
Read
For further reading and listening:





10/

19

Day 4

Thurs.

 




Phrases Exercise

Roman World ProjectAssignment Table 2015
Roman World Paragraph Test on Wednesday, October 26th 

Christianity:

3. How does the teaching of Jesus integrate ancient Greek and ancient Hebrew thought?
4. What methods did the early church fathers (Peter, Paul and Augustine) use to successfully spread Christianity?
5. How did St. Augustine solve the theological problem of evil?

For further reading: Mike S. Presentation on Job (10/01/03)

Homework:

Paragraphs on Christianity

4th Period: Music History: The Elements of Music Melody and Harmony





10/ 20 Day 5 Fri.



The Pont du Gard, a Roman Aqueduct


Map of the Roman Empire 117 AD
Paul Bigot's Model of Ancient Rome


The Coliseum in Rome



Roman World ProjectAssignment Table 2016
Roman World Paragraph Test on Wednesday, October 26th 

Christianity:

3. How does the teaching of Jesus integrate ancient Greek and ancient Hebrew thought?
4. What methods did the early church fathers (Peter, Paul and Augustine) use to successfully spread Christianity?
5. How did St. Augustine solve the theological problem of evil?.

Roman Thought:  

Livy, The History of Rome from its Foundation

Cicero, On the Laws
Lucretius, On the Nature of Things
Marcus Aurelius, Thoughts
Tacitus, Germania 

  1. What do the ancient founding myths of Rome (Romulus and Remus, The Rape of the
    Sabine Women, The Suicide of Lucretia, The Execution of Titus Manlius) teach us
    about Roman character and values?
  2. How did Cicero define the law for the Roman Empire?
  3. How did Lucretius teach us to overcome our fear of death and to lead our lives?
  4. How did Marcus Aurelius' personal philosophy combine elements of Stoicism, Epicureanism
    and Materialism?
  5. What vision of the barbarian 'other' did Tacitus create?

Homework:

  • Paragraphs on Roman Thought

Extra Credit: How does Virgil's revision of Homer teach us about the central values of Roman culture?

4th Period: Music History: The Elements of Music: Instrumentation and Timbre






10/ 23 Day 6
Mon.



The Pantheon in Rome

Paul Bigot's Model of Ancient Rome
A Tour through Ancient Rome in 320 C.E.
(Smarthistory)


The interior of the Pantheon in Rome


Roman World ProjectAssignment Table 2016
Roman World Paragraph Test on Wednesday, October 26th 

Roman Thought:

  1. What do the ancient founding myths of Rome (Romulus and Remus, The Rape of the
    Sabine Women, The Suicide of Lucretia, The Execution of Titus Manlius) teach us
    about Roman character and values?
  2. How did Cicero define the law for the Roman Empire?
  3. How did Lucretius teach us to overcome our fear of death and to lead our lives?
  4. How did Marcus Aurelius' personal philosophy combine elements of Stoicism, Epicureanism
    and Materialism?
  5. What vision of the barbarian 'other' did Tacitus create?

Virgil Aeneid, excerpts  

Extra Credit: How does Virgil's revision of Homer teach us about the central values of Roman culture?

Homework:

Study for Roman World Project

Further reading:
Greenblatt, The Answer Man New Yorker 8-8-11 An ancient poem was rediscovered—and the world swerved.Stephen Greenblatt on the influence of Lucretius on  the Renaissance and Modernity





10/

24

Day 7

Tues.

 




Arch of Titus 81 AD

Equestrian Statue
Marcus Aurelius 161-180 AD

Roman World Project

Assignment Table 2016
Roman World Paragraph Test
 on Wednesday, October 26th 

Directions: Write a paragraph in answer to the following questions. Specific attention will be paid to your topic sentences: make sure that they are terrific!

  1. How does the ambiguity of the ancient Hebrew myths (like The Garden of Eden, The Flood, and Job teach us about the nature of the covenant between God and his chosen people?
  2. Describe the path to the truth that must be followed according to ancient Hebrew thought.
  3. How does the teaching of Jesus integrate ancient Greek and ancient Hebrew thought?
  4. What methods did the early church fathers (Peter, Paul and Augustine) use to successfully spread Christianity?
  5. How did St. Augustine solve the theological problem of evil?
  6. What do the ancient founding myths of Rome (Romulus and Remus, The Rape of the
    Sabine Women, The Suicide of Lucretia, The Execution of Titus Manlius) teach us about
    Roman character and values?
  7. How did Cicero define the law for the Roman Empire?
  8. How did Lucretius teach us to overcome our fear of death and to lead our lives?
  9. How did Marcus Aurelius' personal philosophy combine elements of Stoicism,
    Epicureanism and Materialism?
  10. What vision of the barbarian 'other' did Tacitus create?

Homework:

Maps of Europe:





10/ 25 Day 8 Wed.






Indo-European Groups



Arm Bracelet from recently
discovered Staffordshire Hoard

More Phrases

The Story of English (ppt)

European Map Exercise

 

World Atlas Maps (Rivers, Capitols, Regions, etc.)

Homework:




Map of Anglo-Saxon England 800 AD Illuminated Bible of St. Jerome 698 AD






10/ 26
Day 9 Thurs.



The Cross of Murdoch 923 AD


Sutton Hoo
ceremonial helmet


The Middle Ages:

Homework:

Reading 

Multimedia:

Sound Files:

Old English:

For further reading:

  •  Seamus Heaney on Beowulf
  • J.R.R. Tolkein on Beowulf, "The Monsters and the Critics" (1936)
  • The 13th Warrior starring Antonio Banderas (1999) dir. John McTiernan and Michael Crichton:
    an imagined re-telling of the Beowulf story set in A.D. 922:  an Arab ambassador is exiled from
    his homeland and ends up meeting a group of warrior Norseman, who he soon discovers he is destined
    to join. (You Tube)
  • Beowulf in Cyberspace (With Dual Translation and many graphics... very cool!)





10/ 27 Day 10 Fri.



Viking Invasions (8th c. AD)



Viking Conquests Around the World (6th -10th c.)


Beowulf excerpts  (trans Seamus Heaney) (full text)
Beowulf Lecture Notes

Beowulf Online Resources:

Homework:

Beowulf Creative Writing Assignment 
Due Thursday at 3:30 p.m.


Artifacts Essay Idea?  






10/ 30 Day 1 Mon.



Christ on the Day of Judgment
Tympanum Sculpture at St. Foy

Presentation on Romanesque Architecture and Sculpture

St. Augustine on the Problem of Evil

Homework:

Read: Chaucer and the Medieval World View 

For further reading:

Chaucer Maps
Medieval Social Hierarchy Page (Furr)
Important Events in the Fourteenth Century (Jane Zatta)


The Last Judgment
at Sainte-Foy





10/ 31
Day 2
Tues. 1/2 Day



Chaucer Ellesmere Manuscript  Woodcut



The Renaissance:  

Introduction to Chaucer's Canterbury Tales

Homework:

Memorize the Proem (lines 1-18): Proem read aloud: (lines 1-14; lines 15-29);
Proem Notes;  General Prologue: Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (1397) (Towson University)
(Off-line Text) (Another website)

Other versions:

Notre Dame Gargolyle The extent of Christianity
during the period of the Crusades.





11/ 01 Day 3
Wed.




The Geometry of the Rose Window
at Chartres (animation)


The Apostles at Chartres Cathedral


The Renaissance:  

Introduction to Chaucer's Canterbury Tales
Sophie on "The Middle Ages" (pp.165-187)

Changing Conceptions of the Universe:

Aristotle's Model of the Universe (Video)

Ptolemy's Model of the Universe (Video) 

Copernicus' Model of the Universe (Video)

Kepler's Model of the Universe (Video)

The Medieval World View:

Ulysses' Speech on degree from Shakespeare's  Trolius and Cressida
St. Augustine on the Problem of Evil
St. Thomas Aquinas

Gothic Architecture and Sculpture


Homework:


Extra Credit: COLOR ME Mandala Coloring Book;  Creation of Buddhist Sand Mandala



The Nave of Chartres Cathedral





11/ 02
Day 4
Thurs.

The Ptolemaic universe. From Andraeus Cellarius,
Harmonia macrocosma (Amsterdam, 1660)

Chaucer's General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

General Prologue: Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (1397) (Towson University) (Off-line Text) (Another website)
(User Friendly Text Adobe PDF) 
(Dual Text: Middle English/Modern)
(Interlinear Translation:  Middle English/Modern) 
Proem read aloud: (lines 1-14; lines 15-29)

Proem Notes





11/ 03
Day 5 Fri.



The Knight


The Squire


The Yeoman


Chaucer's General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Student Presentations on Group One: The Knight, The Squire, and The Yeoman

Homework:

Paragraph on Group One

Read: Sophie's World, "The Renaissance", pp. 188-215

The extent of Christianity
during the period of the Crusades.

Longbows at the Battle of Crecy (1356)
in The 100 Years War





11/ 06
Day 6
Mon.


prioress.gif
The Prioresse

friar.gif
The Friar


Student Presentations: Group Two: Chaucer's Canterbury Tales: The Prioresse, The Monk and The Friar

Homework:

Write rough drafts of paragraphs on Groups One and Two


The Monk





11/ 07 Day 7 Tues.



The Wife of Bath


The Franklin


The Seargeant at Law

Student Presentations: Group Three: Chaucer's Canterbury Tales:

Homework:

Write rough draft of paragraphs on Group Three

General Prologue: Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (1397) (Towson University) (Off-line Text) (Another website)
(User Friendly Text Adobe PDF) 
(Dual Text: Middle English/Modern)
(Interlinear Translation:  Middle English/Modern) 
Proem read aloud: (lines 1-14; lines 15-29)

Proem Notes

4th Period: Medieval Music (Powerpoint)

 

Medieval Trade Routes






11/ 08 Day 8 Wed.



The Parson


The Peasants' Revolt 1381 The Death of Wat Tyler

Student Presentations: Group Four: Chaucer's Canterbury Tales:

Homework:

Write rough draft of paragraphs on Group Four:

General Prologue: Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (1397) (Towson University) (Off-line Text) (Another website)
(User Friendly Text Adobe PDF) 
(Dual Text: Middle English/Modern)
(Interlinear Translation:  Middle English/Modern) 
Proem read aloud: (lines 1-14; lines 15-29)

Proem Notes






11/ 09 Day 9 Thurs.



The Miller


The Summoner
Presentation on Medieval Music (Powerpoint)

Student Presentation: Group Five: Chaucer's Canterbury Tales:

Homework:

Write rough draft of paragraphs on Group Five:

Possible Artifacts Essay:


The Pardoner






11/10Day 0Fri.Professional Day
11/ 13 Day 10 Mon.





Presentation on Early Renaissance Art

Peer Review with the Laptop

Homework: (voluntary)
For further reading:  Renaissance Florence






11/ 14
Day 1
Tues.



Masaccio Trinity
1427-28 Fresco
Santa Maria Novella, Florence


 

Giotto di BONDONE The Mourning of Christ c. 1305  Fresco Cappella dell'Arena,Padua   
Text about "The Mourning of Christ"
from E.H. Gombrich, "The Story of Art

Homework:

The Drawings of Leonardo DaVinci

Possible Artifacts Essay:






11/ 15 Day 2
Wed.



Durer, Self-Portrait at 28 (1500)


Pico della Mirandola 1463-1494.
By an unknown artist, in the Uffizi, Florence.
The Explosion of 15th c. Printing: A Data  Visualization (Harvard)




Chaucer Essay Due by 3:30 p.m.

High Renaissance Art and Architecture

The Drawings of Leonardo DaVinci

Art History Quiz

Homework:

The Reformation:






11/ 16
Day 3
Thurs.




Lucas Cranach the Elder, Martin Luther (1483–1546)


The Religious Divisions of Europe during the Reformation


The Renaissance Ideal:

The Reformation:

Homework:


Bruegel, Dulle Griet (Mad Meg) c. 1562






11/ 17 Day 4
Fri.


Chandos Portrait of Shakespeare (1620's)


Shakespeare's Globe (Presentation)
De Witt's sketch of The Swan 1596

William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
Homework:

Mountebank Stage, 15th c.
11/ 20 Day 5
Mon.


Elizabeth I (1533-1603)


Elizabeth I's Funeral Cortege


James I (1566-1625)

The Reformation in England

Backgrounds to Macbeth:
 

Group 1: Tell Macbeth's story as Shakespeare found it in Holinshed's Chronicles:
Group 2:  How did James I try to reassert the power of the throne over Parliament?
Group 3: Describe the early 16th century's understanding of witchcraft and James I's particular fascination with this topic.
Group 4:  Give the class a brief overview of the events which led to the attempted coup known to the English as The Gunpowder Plot.
Group 5: Review for the class the Ancient Greek understanding of tragedy.

Read Macbeth Act 1, scenes i

Homework:



The Gunpowder Plot ConspiratorsDucking a Witch in 16th c. England

11/ 21
Day 6
Tues.

Image from Macbeth, Davies/Dyer,

Royal Shakespeare Company, August 1983


Laurence Olivier as Macbeth (1955)


Nunn/McKellan 1976

Backgrounds to Macbeth Presentations:

Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act I, scenes i-iii

Video:

Paragraph One: 
  • The Opening of Macbeth
    • Machiavelli on Duncan's Leadership
    • The Witches and Tragic Prophecy (compare to Oedipus Rex)
    • Our First Impressions of Macbeth: the Warrior Thane
  • The Prophecy and Macbeth's 1st Soliloquy "Two Truths..."
Homework: Memory Passage:

So foul and fair a day I have not seen...

11/22Day 0Wed.Thanksgiving Break
11/23Day 0Thurs.Thanksgiving Break
11/24Day 0Fri.Thanksgiving Break
11/ 27 Day 7 Mon.


Henry V


Portrait of Machiavelli c. 1500


 

Vivian Leigh as Lady Macbeth (1955)


McKellan and Dench (1976)

Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act I, scenes i-iii

Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act I, scenes iv-vii

Macbeth and Machiavelli:

What kind of king is Duncan? How effective has he been? Why?

Notes on Machiavelli:
  • Virtue vs. Vertu 
  • The Medieval Mystery Play: Satan vs. Macbeth 
  • Machiavelli, from The Prince Intro, chapters 14-19, 26 
Shakespeare on Machiavelli: Macbeth, Lady Macbeth (and the Baby): Paragraph:
  • How is Shakespeare rebutting Machiavelli's thesis in "The Prince"?
  • What will be the consequence of Lady Macbeth's actions?

Interpretations of Lady Macbeth (The Prophecy):
Sarah Siddons: The Monster vs. Ellen Terry: The Loving Wife (See Rosenberg, The Masks of Macbeth)

Sarah Siddons as Lady Macbeth (1785)"Ellen Terry as Lady Mcbeth" John Singer Sargent (1889)

Homework:

11/ 28 Day 8 Tues.

Henry Irving as Macbeth (1890)


Francesca Annis as Lady Macbeth (1969)


Scotland (Here is a neat interactive map
of Macbeth's Scotland)

The Emergence of the Soul:

Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act II, scenes i-iv:

Crossing the Threshold:

Paragraph: How is Shakespeare rebutting Machiavelli's thesis in "The Prince"? What will be the consequence of Lady Macbeth's actions?

Paragraph: Explain The Magic in Macbeth: Shakespeare's Crowning Irony

Paragraph: What is Shakespeare's understanding of the nature of evil? (How is it derived from Chaucer?)

Homework:


Blake, "Pity" (1795)
11/ 29 Day 9
Wed.


Laurence Olivier and Vivian Leigh


McKellan 1976


 Peter O'Toole and Frances Tomelty 1980


The Emergence of the Soul:

Crossing the Threshold:

Holding the Throne:

Paragraphs:

  • Why is the relationship between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth disintegrating?

Homework:

Laurence Olivier and Vivian Leigh






11/ 30 Day 10
Thurs.

Confronting Banquo's Ghost


"Let it come down"
(Murderer #2 in Macbeth, III iii)


Crossing the Threshold:

Holding the Throne:

The Climax of the Action: The Banquet Scene (III iv)

Paragraphs:

  • How is Shakespeare rebutting Machiavelli's thesis in "The Prince"? What will be the consequence of Lady Macbeth's actions?
  • What is Shakespeare's understanding of the nature of evil? (How is it derived from Chaucer?)
  • Why is the relationship between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth disintegrating?
  • Explain The Magic in Macbeth: Shakespeare's Crowning Irony
  • What is the terrible irony of Macbeth's superhuman achievement in banishing the ghost of Banquo?

Homework:

Read Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act IV, scenes i-iii





12/ 01 Day 1
Fri. LONG ASSEMBLY

Montana Shakespeare in Schools 2012




McKellan (1976)

The Climax of the Action: The Banquet Scene (III iv)  

The Second Visit to the Witches:  (Video: McKellan)


Paragraph:
  • What has Macbeth turned into by the end of his second encounter with the Weird Sisters?
Homework:

Gielgud 1962
12/ 04 Day 2
Mon.

(Lady MacDuff and her son in Macbeth IV ii)

Lady Macbeth Sleepwalking

MacDuff Mourns his Children

The Murder of Lady Macduff and her Children: (Video: McKellan)

Macbeth, Act V scene i-viii

Lady Macbeth Sleepwalking:  MacDuff Learns of his Family's Murder:

Paragraphs:

  • How is Shakespeare rebutting Machiavelli's thesis in "The Prince"
  • What will be the consequence of Lady Macbeth's actions?
  • Explain The Magic in Macbeth: Shakespeare's Crowning Irony
  •  What is Shakespeare's understanding of the nature of evil?
    (How is it derived from Chaucer?)
  • Why has the relationship between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth disintegrated? 
  • What is the terrible irony of Macbeth's superhuman achievement in
    banishing the ghost of Banquo?
  • What has Macbeth turned into by the end of his second encounter
    with the Weird Sisters?
  • On what does the stability of a country depend once Macbeth has been deposed? 

Homework:


Lady Macbeth Sleepwalking






12/ 05 Day 3
Tues.

Birnam Wood Comes to Dunsinane


No Man of Woman Born Can Harm Macbeth

Macbeth, Act V scene i-vii

Birnam Wood Comes to Dunsinane:  The Final Fight:Homework:
For further reading:





12/ 06
Day 4
Wed.



"Let it come down"
(Murderer #2 in Macbeth, III iii)

 


"He has killed me, mother..."
(MacDuff's Son in Macbeth IV ii)


It seems that drink gave thee the lie last night!

 

Essay on Macbeth (Outline)

Gilman Shakespeare Festival

Rehearsal Instructions:

Scene Choices:

Homework:

Start memorizing your lines!

12/ 07 Day 5 Thurs.




"All Hail Macbeth that shalt be King hereafter!"

 

Essay on Macbeth (Outline)

Gilman Shakespeare Festival

Rehearsal Instructions:

Homework:

Divide up Promptbook responsibilities.






12/ 08 Day 6
Fri.




"My thought, whose murder yet is but fantastical,
Shakes so my single state of man that function
Is smother'd in surmise, and nothing is
But what is not.
."

 

Gilman Shakespeare Festival

Rehearsal Instructions:






12/ 11 Day 7 Mon.



"Yet who would have thought
the old man to have so much
blood in him..."

 

Gilman Shakespeare Festival

Rehearsal Instructions:

Homework:

  • Promptbooks Due at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday





12/
12
Day 8
Tues.





Shakespeare Festival Dress Rehearsal during 2nd period in Centennial Hall





12/
13
Day 9
Wed.
Shakespeare Festival




Shakespeare Festival during 1st period in Centennial Hall

Promptbooks Due at 3:30 p.m. 





12/
14
Day 10
Thurs.



 



The Seventeenth Century:

 

It was during the 1600s that Galileo and Newton founded modern science;
that Descartes began modern philosophy; that Hugo Grotius initiated international law;
and that Thomas Hobbes and John Locke started modern political theory. In the same
century strong centralized European states entered into worldwide international
competition for wealth and power, accelerating the pace of colonization in America
and Asia. The Dutch, French, Spanish, Portuguese, English, and others, all struggled
to maintain and extend colonies and trading-posts in distant corners of the globe,
with profound and permanent consequences for the whole world. They also fought
one another in Europe, where warfare grew increasingly complex and expensive.
To gain an edge against other powers in war, European governments invested in
research in military technology, and the seventeenth century was consequently an
age of military revolution, enabling Europeans from then on to defeat most non-European
peoples relatively easily in battle.  (Somerville)

 

Map of Europe, 1600  

 

Sovereign: The Emergence of the Modern State (ppt.)


(Animation: The Atlantic Slave Trade in Two Minutes)

The South Sea Bubble (movie)

Homework:

For extra reading

12/ 15 Day 1 Fri.



Kepler's Laws of Motion


Hooker's Flea

Historical Backgrounds:

Revolution in Scientific Thought:

1.   Define the scientific method.

2.   How did the Renaissance interest in perspective contribute to the scientific revolution?

3.   What was the significance of Copernicus’ heliocentric theory?

4.   How did Galileo’s discoveries confirm Copernicus’s theories and change our understanding
of the nature of the heavens?

5.   What are Newton’s three laws of motion?

6.   What is inductive reasoning??  

7.   What is deductive reasoning?

8.   How did Descartes prove the existence of God?

9.   How did Spinoza conceive of God?


Revolution in Political Thought:

10.  What are the key features of the emerging modern state?

11.  According to Machiavelli, why should a leader avoid morality in his administration
of government?

12.  What was Hobbes’ vision of human nature?

13.  What is Hobbes’ version of the social contract?

14.  Why was an absolute monarchy necessary in Hobbes’ state?

15.  What was Locke’s vision of human nature?

16.  What was Locke’s theory of natural rights?

17.  Under what conditions does a citizen have the right to rebel, according to Locke?


The Enlightenment: pp.12-24

18.  How did the philosophes believe they would inaugurate an enlightened age?

19.  How did the philosophes apply Newton’s discovery of universal laws governing
motion to the problems of society and government?

20.  What were the deists’ religious beliefs?

21.  What was Locke’s theory of epistemology, the way humans learn?

22.  How does Locke’s epistemology refute the Church’s idea of original sin?

23.  What reform movements were inaugurated by the philosphes? How did they believe
a utopian society could be created?

Homework:

Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679) John Locke (1632-1704)
12/ 18 Day 2 Mon. EXAMS
12/ 19 Day 3 Tues. EXAMS
12/20Day 0Wed.WINTER BREAK
01/02Day 0TuesWINTER BREAK
01/ 03
Day 4
Wed.



Peter Paul Rubens,
The Elevation of the Cross, (1610-1611)
(Smarthistory video)


Rembrandt, Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Tulp (1633)

The Enlightenment of the 18th Century  (Quiz)

 Seventeenth Century English Political Thought: Absolutism vs. Parliamentarianism (Rogers)

Philosophical Implications of the New Cosmology:
Baroque and Mannerist Art

Homework:

Rev. Charles Davy: "The Earthquake at Lisbon" (1755)
Responses to the The Lisbon Earthquake (1755) (Notes) (Questions)

For further reading:
  • Fiat Lux   
  • Historian Peter Gay interprets the Enlightenment as a coherent and evolving system of thought. For Gay, Enlightenment thinkers were united in their firm rejection of the traditional religion of western civilization, Christianity.
01/ 04
Day 5
Thurs.



The Enlightenment of the 18th Century

Rev. Charles Davy: "The Earthquake at Lisbon" (1755)
Responses to the The Lisbon Earthquake (1755) (Notes) (Questions)

Homework:

Read Swift, A Modest Proposal (1729) Notes (Quiz) Swift's Biography; Define Satire. (OED) The Reality: The Plantation System in 18th c. Ireland

For further reading: (mandatory for all Irish!):

from Desmond's Concise History of Ireland






01/

05

Day 6

Fri.







Jonathan Swift (1667-1745)

Irish Beggarwoman and Child
 (Illustrated London News, 1843)



William Hogarth, Gin Lane (1751)
More Hogarth: The Rake's Progress


Swift's Biography, (Gulliver's Travels, 1726) 

Define Satire

L. satira, satura satirical poetry, poetic medley, fr. (lanx) satura full plate, plate filled with various fruits. A poem or prose piece in which prevailing vices are held up to ridicule. (OED)

Swift, A Modest Proposal (1729) Notes (Quiz) (The Reality: The Plantation System in 18th c. Ireland; Map of Ireland 1700)

Study Questions:

  1. At the outset of this essay what does the reader expect to be the author's point?
  2. What is the real target of Swift’s attack in this savage satire?
  3. What Enlightenment values are also under attack?
  4. How is the real character of this landlord revealed beneath the highly rational surface of the prose? (Diction, Emphasis)
  5. Does Swift ever overtly show his hand or deliberately drop his pose? (His true proposal)
  6. Compare Swift's view of poverty with William Hogarth's depiction of the ravages of drug abuse (Gin Lane) in London.

Homework:

Swift Satire Writing Project (Due Friday by 3:30 pm)


for Further Study:

01/

08

Day 7

Mon.





Engraving of Voltaire published as the frontispiece to an 1843 edition of his Dictionnaire philosophique

Essay on Voltaire's Candide

The Enlightenment of the 18th Century:

Philosophical Implications of the New Cosmology:

Read Voltaire, Candide (1758) Chapters 1-3 (Study Guide)

Homework:

Voltaire, Candide (1758) Chapters 1-3 (Study Guide)

For further reading:





01/

09

Day 8

Tues.





The Baron ... seeing this cause and this effect
, 1787 edition


 
... chased Candide away with great kicks
in the rear, 1787 edition


Candide fled as quickly as possible
to another village, 1787 edition

Essay on Voltaire's Candide

Voltaire, Candide (1758) Chapters 1-3 (Quiz1

Leonard Bernstein, Overture to his operetta Candide (1954)

"A man who thinks all the world exists for his benefit is no better than the pampered goose who believes that the farmer who fattens him exists for his." (Alexander Pope)

How can this guy who argues that 'Whatever is, is right' say such a thing?

Know thyself, presume not God to scan
The proper study of mankind is Man (1-2

"Evil" defined: Evil cannot be defined as merely the consequence of crime or unfortunate events. Evil shakes our faith in the order of the universe:

  • metaphysical evil suggests a defect in the relation between the physical structure of matter and time: entropy
  • natural evil results from earthquakes, tsunamis, and the like
  • moral evil results from deliberate human wrong-doing or from the reward of vice and the punishment of virtue.
  • Defending Optimistic Determinism: "Everything is for the best in this the best of all possible worlds." (Prof. Pangloss) Evil must be part of a plan which will lead us to ultimate harmony.
  • Voltaire on Final Causes from his Philosophical Dictionary

Voltaire, Candide (1758) Chapters 1-3 (Study Guide

Chapter 1: Candide's Expulsion from Westphalia (The Fall of Man) (Googledocs Chapter 1)
Chapter 2: The Recruiting Officers (Googledocs Chapter 2
Chapter 3: The Seven Years War (Googledocs Chapter3) (notes)  Clip from Barry Lyndon (1975) dir. Stanley Kubrick: Barry's First Experience of War 
  • Does Voltaire believe that education and experience can condition us to avoid evil? 
  • What is Voltaire’s vision of the heroic adventure of warfare?
  • What do Anabaptists like Jacques believe? Why does he save Candide?

Homework:

Voltaire, Candide, Chapters 4-7   (Study Guide)

For further study: God's Advocates: Leibniz and Pope vs. Bayle’s Manichaeism






01/ 10 Day 9
Wed.  



Lisbon Harbor During the Earthquake of 1755


Goya, Those Specks of Dust. 1796-1797


The Grand Inquisitor

An Auto-da-fe in Lisbon


Essay on Voltaire's Candide

The Problem Of Evil (Review) (Answers)

Voltaire, Candide, Chapters 4-7 (Quiz) (Study Guide


Chapter 1: Candide's Expulsion from Westphalia (The Fall of Man)
Chapter 2: The Recruiting Officers
Chapter 3: The Seven Years War (notes)
  • Does Voltaire believe that education and experience can condition us to avoid evil? 
  • What is Voltaire’s vision of the heroic adventure of warfare?
  • What do Anabaptists like Jacques believe? Why does he save Candide?
Chapter 4:  Pangloss with the Pox and Jacques the Anabaptist (Googledocs Chapter 4)
Chapter 5:  The Death of Jacques and The Lisbon Earthquake (Googledocs Chapter 5) Chapter 6:  The Inquisition’s Auto-da fe (Googledocs Chapter 6)
Chapter 7:  Reunion with Cunegonde   (Googledocs Chapter 7)
  • How did the Inquisition respond to the Lisbon Earthquake?
  • What happened immediately after the auto-da-fe? (What is Voltaire's take on the
    link between moral evil and natural evil?)
  • Has Candide learned anything yet? How is Candide saved (once again)?
  • How did Cunegonde survive? What do you make of Voltaire’s choice to make
    Candide and Cunegonde indestructible? 

Homework:

 Music of the Classical Era (Web Format)

  • Sonata Form: Four Movements (Fast; Slow; Dance; Fast)
  • Movement Form: (Exposition; Development; Recapitulation; Coda)
  • Hayden, Drum Roll Symphony #103 London (1795)   1st Movement (Sonata Form) (10:05)
Mozart, Symphony #40 in G Minor, K. 550 (1788)





01/ 11 Day 10
Thurs.



Candide Murders the Inquisitor


The Old Woman Among the Moors


Delacroix, Death of Sardanopalus (1827)


Essay on Voltaire's Candide

Voltaire, Candide, Chapters 8-12 (Quiz) (Study Guide

The Problem Of Evil (Review) (Answers)

Chapter 8: Cunegonde's Story: Shared by the Inquisitor and the Jew  (Googledocs Chapter 8)
Chapter 9: Candide Commits Murder (Twice!) (Googledocs Chapter 9)
Chapter 10: Bound for the New World (Googledocs Chapter 10)
  • Has Cunegonde learned anything thus far from her adventures?
  • What compromise regarding the possession of Cunegonde was reached
    between the Inquisitor and Don Isaachar? (Can reason enable natural
    enemies to overcome their differences?)
  • What moral judgment should we attach to Candide's killing of Don Isaachar?
    (Is it murder?) How about the killing of the Inquisitor which follows almost
    immediately thereafter? (Is that murder?)
  • What conclusion should we draw from Voltaire’s obvious anti-Semitism?
    (To what extent does this irrational belief discredit him?)
  • Who saves Candide and Cunegonde? (Why?)
  • What is Candide's response when Cunegonde tells him that all of her jewelry
    has been stolen? (Has he learned anything?)
  • Why does Candide believe that the New World will be different from the Old?
    (Has he learned anything by this point? How about Cunegonde?)
Chapter 11: The Old Woman's Adventures: The Wheel of Fortune (Googledocs Chapter 11)
Chapter 12: The Old Woman's Adventures: The Plague, Slavery, Cannibalism, Suicide (Googledocs Chapter 12)
  • What should we make of Voltaire's racism?
  • To what indignities was the young princess subjected? Who saves her? (Why?)
    What misfortune befalls her in Algiers?
  • How did she lose her buttock in Russia?  
  • Despite all her terrible ordeals, the Old Woman never commits suicide.
    What is the most important lesson she has learned?

Homework:

Voltaire, Candide, Chapters 13-18 (Study Guide)





01/12Day 1Fri.





Candide Shoots the Apes



Candide and Cacambo 

loading the Flying Sheep



Essay on Voltaire's Candide

The Problem Of Evil (Review) (Answers

Potential Artifacts Topic: The Mission and the Guarani Wars of 1750’s (“The Guarani”; “The Sword of the Word” (LOC)) The Jesuit Missions of Paraguay, Argentina, and Brazil (ppt)

Voltaire, Candide, Chapters 13-18 (Quiz) (Study Guide)

Chapter 13:     The New World: Buenos Aires   (Goodgle Docs Chapter 13)
Chapter 14:     The Jesuit Utopia  (GoogleDocs Chapter 14)
Chapter 15:     Candide Kills his Brother-In-Law (GoogleDocs Chapter 15
Chapter 16:     The Biglugs: Man in the State of Nature (GoogleDocs Chapter 16)

  • Why does Cunegonde decide to dump Candide for Governor Don Fernando
    d'Ibaraa y Figueora y Mascarenes y Lampourdos y Souza
    ?  Do you agree
    with the old woman’s advice? What about the ideal of love? Look carefully at
    Candide's response when he learns that he has been dumped. Has he learned anything?
  • Who is Cacambo? (Keep track of how many times he saves Candide's life.)
  • Describe Voltaire's impression of the New World paradise  created by the
    Jesuits in South America. How different is it from the Old World?
    (See Jesuit Missions in South America)
  • Who does the commandant of the Jesuit mission turn out to be? Why does
    Candide kill him?
  • What does Candide find out right after saving the girls in the jungle by shooting
    the monkey men that had been chasing them? (Do we make this kind of judgment
    about foreign cultures often? See Pinker on the teddy bear named 'Muhammad'.)
  • What did the Biglugs plan to do to Candide after they capture him? How does
    Cacambo save Candide once again?
  • What is the most basic law of nature? (Would Voltaire call this law evil?) What version
    of the social contract would Voltaire embrace? (Compare to Hobbes and Locke)

Chapter 17:     Eldorado (GoogleDocs Chapter 17)
Chapter 18:     The Government of Eldorado (GoogleDocs Chapter 18)

  • What was the legend of El Dorado? (See Time) ("The Gilded Man")
  • After showing the reality of society in the New World, Voltaire presents his
    vision of Utopia.
  • How do Candide and Cacambo find El Dorado? How was this community
    founded? What economy? What religion? What government?  What is the one rule
    you must follow if you want to live in El Dorado?
  • Why does Candide insist on leaving El Dorado? What do you make of this choice?
    How does he and Cacambo get over the mountains?

Homework:

Voltaire, Candide, chapters 19-21 (Study Guide)
01/ 15 Day 1 Mon. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. DAY

Houdon, Voltaire (1781)
01/ 16 Day 2
Tues.



This is the price for the sugar 

you eat in Europe


Candide and Cacambo 

loading the Flying Sheep


Essay on Voltaire's Candide

The Problem Of Evil (Review) (Answers) (Martin the Manichean and the Evil God Problem)

Voltaire, Candide, chapters 19-21 (Quiz) (Study Guide

Chapter 19:     Surinam (Google Docs Chapter 19)
Chapter 20:     Martin the Manichean  (GoogleDocs Chapter 20)
Chapter 21:     More of Martin’s Philosophy (GoogleDocs Chapter 21)

  • How did the slave lose his hand and leg? Describe the conditions on
    sugar plantation in the French West Indies. These plantations were the most
    profitable in all the French Empire. (How do you think they financed their wars?)
  • When Candide hears the black man's story, what does he finally conclude?
    (Is this a bad moment for him?)
  • What is Candide’s plan to recover Cunegonde?
  • How does Candide get ripped off by Mynheer Vanderdendur?
  • How does Candide meet Martin the Manichean? (What is a Socinian? What
    is a Manichaean?) What is the topic of their conversations enroute to France?
    What is Martin's argument for the existence of Satan?
  • Does what happens during the sea battle to confirm Martin’s philosophy?
    What is Voltaire’s point?
  • What is the purpose served by the design of the universe, according to Martin?
    Would Voltaire agree with Martin?  What is Martin’s conception of
    man in the state of nature?
  • How has Candide emended Pangloss’ philosophy? What keeps Candide from
    embracing Martin's dark philosophy? What has he learned?
Homework:
01/ 17 Day 3 Wed.





Candide Reunited with Cunegonde


Candide in his Garden


Essay on Voltaire's Candide

The Problem Of Evil (Review) (Answers)

Voltaire, Candide, chapters 27-30 (Quiz) (Study Guide)

Chapter 27:     Constantinople Bound: the Galleys of the Turks (GoogleDocs Chapter 27)
Chapter 28:     The Adventures of Pangloss and the Baron
Chapter 29:     Reunion with Cunegonde and the Old Woman (GoogleDocs Chapter 29)
Chapter 30:     The Conclusion (GoogleDocs Chapter 30)

  • How did all our heroes wind up in this part of the world? (I thought the
    Professor and the Baron were both dead!)  How did the Baron wind up
    enslaved and tortured in the Pasha’s galley? How did Pangloss survive hanging?
    How did Pangloss wind up in hot water again? (How does Pangloss hint that he
    has modified his belief in optimistic determinism?)
  • What sad event prevents Candide from achieving perfect happiness? How will
    this occurrence complete his education?
  • Where do Candide and his friends decide to make their home? (Recognize this place?)
    Why does the family decide to get rid of the Baron? (How do they do it?) What is life
    like on Candide’s little farm? Is that so bad?
  • What wisdom does the dervish share with the family about the origin of evil?
    What is their neighbor's philosophy of life? How does the existence of ice cream fit
    into Voltaire’s philosophy?
  • Has Candide learned anything from his experience?
Homework:


01/ 18 Day 4
Thurs.




01/ 19 Day 5
Fri.






Essay on Voltaire's Candide Due by 3:30 p.m.

01/ 22 Day 6 Mon.. BREAK

01/ 24 Day 8 Tues. SECOND SEMESTER BEGINS