Russian Studies EK 71
Spragins
Fall 2013
3rd Period EVEN Days; Drop Down Day 1

Room GC 202
Office Hours 2:15-3:30 p.m. (daily)
jspragins@gilman.edu
 
(410) 337-9060






Fall Outline






Natasha's Dance (2002) by Orlando Figes (project)







Alexander Alexeieff, color wood engraving for Pushkin's The Queen of Spades (London, Blackamore Press, 1923)
Pushkin and Gogol Short Stories





Dead Souls (1842) by Nikolai Gogol





Pavlishchev Bor was built in the 18th century and owned by the Stepanovs family of Arkhangelsk, Russia
Fathers and Sons (1862) by Ivan Turgenev





Crime and Punishment (1865) by Fyodor Dostoevsky






The Death of Ivan Ilych (1882) by Lev Tolstoy






Anton Chekhov (1860-1904)

Chekhov, Selected Short Stories: "Peasants" (1897); "The Darling" (1899); "In the Ravine" (1900)





Month Day   Cycle Day  Day Assignment

 

08/ 28
Day 0 Thurs. Mini- Schedule



Map of Russia Today


Blank Map


 

Course Description
Course Texts

The Geography of Russia

Homework:

Take a virtual trip to Russia and learn something about the geography of the country. (You might even want to make yourself a map.)

For further reading:





08/ 30 Day 1 Fri. Drop Down Day




Argunov, Portrait of Praskovya Sheremeteva (1802)



Overview Lecture (powerpoint) (notes) (August H. Notes)

Natasha's Dance: Opening Project : European Russia: Choose an artifact described in the assigned reading to bring up in class which supports Figes' overall point about Russian society and culture.

Short Essay Question: “What was it in the zeitgeist of early nineteenth century Russia that produced the literary explosion which began with Pushkin?”

Homework

    Chapter 1. European Russia (Notes) (1-69)

    1. Founding of St. Petersburg (Brian C.)
    2. ‘Fountain House’ and the Sheremetev family (Ian C.)
    3. Praskovya Sheremeteva and the Serf Artist (Gabe D.)
    4. The Russian Split Personality (Fitz L.)
    5.  The Superfluous Man (Linan L.)
    6. The Grand Tour (Erin M.)
    7. Impact of the French Revolution (Robert P.)
    For further reading:





    09/ 02 Day 0 Mon. LABOR DAY




    09/

    03 Day 2       Tues.



    St. Petersburg (1760)


    Falconet's Statue of Peter the Great (1788) (painting by Vasily Ivanovich Surikov)


    Tropinin, Portrait of  Pushkin (1827)


    A wet nurse in traditional Russian dress.  Early-twentieth-century photograph

     
    Perov, Hunters at Rest (1871)




    Figes, Natasha's Dance (introduction) pp. xxv-xxxiii (notes)
    Natasha's Dance: Opening Project : European Russia: Choose an artifact to bring up in class which supports Figes' overall point about Russian society and culture. Use my notes if you wish.

    Your assignment is to read the first two chapters of Natasha’s Dance.  That’s 169 pages. But more importantly, you should read the particular section of the text assigned below and prepare a report on an artifact (a work of art, music, literature, or an historical document) and be prepared to present your report to the class.

    Remember, you are preparing for your first essay assignment: “What was it in the zeitgeist of early nineteenth century Russia that produced the literary explosion which began with Pushkin?” Create or save your report on the Googledocs page I sent you.

    This essay is due September 12th.

    Chapter 1. European Russia (Notes) (1-69)

    1. Founding of St. Petersburg (Brian C.)
    2. ‘Fountain House’ and the Sheremetev family (Ian C.)
    3. Praskovya Sheremeteva and the Serf Artist (Gabe D.)
    4. The Russian Split Personality (Fitz L.)
    5.  The Superfluous Man (Linan L.)
    6. The Grand Tour (Erin M.)
    7. Impact of the French Revolution (Robert P.)

    Chapter 2: Children of 1812 (Notes) (70-162)

    1. The Decembrists: Birth of the Intelligentsia/ Liberal Russian Nationalism (Tom R.)
    2. The Decembrist Revolt  (C.J. R.)
    3. Exile to Siberia (Tyler W).
    4. The Vogue for Russian Nationalism (Ben.W.)
    5. Noble Childhood (Garrett W.)
    6. Competing Myths of Russian History (Mr. S.)
    7. Volkonsky’s Return from Exile and Emancipation (Huntington W.)

    Chapter 3. Moscow! Moscow! (148-162)

    1. Moscow (Dorsey Y.)
    2. St. Petersburg (John L.)
    Homework:
    • Chapter 1. European Russia (Notes) (1-69)

    For further reading:






    09/ 04 Day 3 Wed.





    09/ 05 Day 0 Thurs. Rosh Hashanah





    09/
    06
    Day 4
    Fri.





    F.-B.Rastrelli, The Winter Palace; Tsarskoy Selo; The Sheremetev Palace in St Petersburg (Fountain House)

    Patersen, Vue de la Grande au Papais de L'Empereur Alexandre (1803)

    The Westernized Fop in Griboyedov’s Woe from Wit (1823)

    Group Projects on European Russia

    “What was it in the zeitgeist of early nineteenth century Russia that produced the literary explosion which began with Pushkin?”

    Chapter 1. European Russia (Notes) (1-69)
    1. Founding of St. Petersburg (Brian C.)
    2. ‘Fountain House’ and the Sheremetev family (Ian C.)
    3. Praskovya Sheremeteva and the Serf Artist (Gabe D.)
    4. The Russian Split Personality (Fitz L.)
    5.  The Superfluous Man (Linan L.)
    6. The Grand Tour (Erin M.)
    7. Impact of the French Revolution (Robert P.)

    Homework: 

    Chapter 2: Children of 1812 (Notes) (pp.70-146)

    1. The Decembrists: Birth of the Intelligentsia/ Liberal Russian Nationalism (Tom R.)
    2. The Decembrist Revolt  (C.J. R.)
    3. Exile to Siberia (Tyler W).
    4. The Vogue for Russian Nationalism (Ben.W.)
    5. Noble Childhood (Garrett W.)
    6. Competing Myths of Russian History (Mr. S.)
    7. Volkonsky’s Return from Exile and Emancipation (Huntington W.)

    Chapter 3. Moscow! Moscow!(148-162)

    1. Moscow (Dorsey Y.)
    2. St. Petersburg (John L.)

    For further reading: 






    09/ 09 Day 5 Mon.





    09/ 10 Day 6 Tues.




    Lake Baikal, Irkutsk Siberia


    A wet nurse in traditional Russian dress.  Early-twentieth-century photograph

     
    Perov, Hunters at Rest (1871)


    Monument to the millennium of Russia in the square in front of St Sophia’s Cathedral, Novgorod


    Presentations:

    Chapter 1. European Russia (Notes) (1-69)
    1. Founding of St. Petersburg (Brian C.)
    2. ‘Fountain House’ and the Sheremetev family (Ian C.)
    3. Praskovya Sheremeteva and the Serf Artist (Gabe D.)
    4. The Russian Split Personality (Fitz L.)
    5.  The Superfluous Man (Linan L.)
    6. The Grand Tour (Erin M.)
    7. Impact of the French Revolution (Robert P.)

    Chapter 2: Children of 1812 (Notes) (70-146)

    1. The Decembrists: Birth of the Intelligentsia/ Liberal Russian Nationalism (Tom R.)
    2. The Decembrist Revolt  (C.J. R.)
    3. Exile to Siberia (Tyler W).
    4. The Vogue for Russian Nationalism (Ben.W.)
    5. Noble Childhood (Garrett W.)
    6. Competing Myths of Russian History (Mr. S.)
    7. Volkonsky’s Return from Exile and Emancipation (Huntington W.)

    Chapter 3. Moscow! Moscow! (47-162)

    1. Moscow (Dorsey Y.)
    2. St. Petersburg (John L.)

    Homework:

    • Short Essay: “What was in the zeitgeist of early nineteenth century Russia that produced the literary explosion which began with Pushkin?” Due Thursday at 3:30 p.m.
    For further reading: 





    09/

    11 Day 7  Wed.





    09/ 12 Day 8 Thurs. PARENTS NIGHT



    Aleksandr Pushkin (1799-1837), Russia's national poet


    Natasha's Dance Essay Due at 3:30 p.m.

    “What was it in the zeitgeist of early nineteenth century Russia that produced the literary explosion which began with Pushkin?”

    19th Century Overview: Part One; Part Two (notes)

    Homework:

    Pushkin, "The Queen of Spades" (1834) (introduction)










    09/ 13 Day 9 Fri.





    09/ 16 Day 10
    Mon.



     (1910)

    Pushkin, "The Queen of Spades" (1834) (introduction) (discussion) (quiz 

    Homework:






    09/ 17 Day 1 Tues. Reading Day










    09/ 18 Day 2 Wed.



    Falconet's Statue of Peter the Great (1788) (painting by Vasily Ivanovich Surikov) (illustration) (dramatic photo)

    Pushkin, "The Bronze Horseman" (1833) (introduction) (illustration) (discussion) (Essay Topic) (kviz) (Figes on "The Bronze Horseman") (Harvard Page)

    Homework:





    09/ 19
    Day 3 Thurs.





    09/ 20 Day 4 Fri.



    Nikola Gogol (1809-1852)


    Kustodiev, Akaky Akakiyevich on Nevsky Prospekt (1905)

    Gogol, "The Overcoat " (1842) (study guide) (discussion) (quiz) (Figes on "The Overcoat")

    Homework:

    Belinsky, "Letter to Gogol” (1847) (Discussion) (Essay Topic)





    09/ 23 Day 5 Mon.





    09/ 24 Day 6 Tues.


    Vissarion Belinsky (1811-1848)

    Belinsky, "Letter to Gogol” (1847) (Discussion) (Essay Topic) (quiz) (Notes)

    Homework:

    Pushkin/Gogol Paper

     






    09/ 25 Day 7
    Wed.





    09/ 26 Day 8
    Thurs.



    Goncahrova, Backdrop for The Firebird  (1910)

    Pushkin/Gogol Paper due at 3:30 p.m.

    Homework:






    09/ 27 Day 9
    Fri.. Girls' Retreat





    9/ 30 Day 10
    Mon.



    Monastery at Optina Pustyn


    Rubiev Icon (1460)


    Surikov, Boyarina Mozorova (1880)


    The Noon Witch


    Gorbatov, The Invisible Town of Kietzh (1913)


    Figes, Chapter 5.   In Search of the Russian Soul (Notes) The Russian word Poshlust is difficult to translate: it means puffed up or blown up. Russians use it to criticize things they find to be fake,  not only the obviously trashy but also the falsely important, the falsely beautiful, the falsely clever, the falsely attractive....  The poshlust which Chichikov personifies is one of the main attributes of the Devil, in whose existence, let it be added, Gogol believed far more seriously than he did in that of God. The chink in Chichikov's armor, that rusty chink emitting a faint but dreadful smell (a punctured can of conserved lobster tampered with and forgotten by some meddling fool in the pantry) is the organic aperture in the devil's armor. It is the essential stupidity of universal poshlust. (Nabokov)

    • Lectures on Russian Literature (1981)by Vladimir Nabokov: Gogol's "The Overcoat"
    • Nikolai Gogol (1961) by Vladimir Nabokov; From Chapter 3: “Our Mr. Chichikov”; part two
    • Lectures on Russian Literature (1981) by Vladimir Nabokov Dead Soul
    Journal Entry #1 (Natalie Goldberg's Rules) (prompt) (prompt2) (Goldberg 10-11)

    Homework:
    • Read Gogol, Dead Souls vol. 1 (1842) Chapters 1 and 2: pp. 3-36
    • Study Guide:





    10/ 01 Day 1 Tues. READING DAY



    Chichikov dances as he dresses for the Governor's Ball.



    German Idealism:

    "Nature is visible Spirit; Spirit is invisible Nature." (Schelling)


    Hume, Kant and Hegel: Intellectual Backgrounds to Romanticism (Perry) (Study Guide)

    For further reading:

    Backgrounds to Romantic Poetry: Sophie on Romanticism; Sophie on Kant; Sophie on Hegel
    Sophie's World 
    (Gaarder), pp. 322-341 Kant
    Sophie's World (Gaarder), pp. 342-359 Romanticism

    For future philosophers:

    Kant: A New Epistemology (Theory of Learning)



    10/ 02 Day 2
    Wed.



    Landowner Manilov welcomes Chichikov to his estate.

    Gogol, Dead Souls vol. 1 (1842) Chapters 1 and 2: pp. 3-36 Journal Entry #2: (Natalie Goldberg's Rules prompt (3)

    Homework:
    • Read Gogol, Dead Souls vol. 1 (1842) Chapters 3 and 4: pp. 37-87
    • Study Guide:
      • Chapter Three: The Widow Korobochka 
      • Chapter Four: Nozdryov





    10/ 03 Day 3
    Thurs.





    10/ 04 Day 4
    Fri.








    Gogol, Dead Souls vol. 1 (1842) Chapters 3 and 4: pp. 37-87
    Journal Entry #3: (prompt 1) (prompt 2) (Goldberg 134)

    Homework:
    • Read Gogol, Dead Souls vol. 1 (1842) Chapters 5 and 6: pp. 88-132
    • Study Guide:










    10/ 07 Day 5
    Mon.





    10/ 08 Day 6             Tues.









    Gogol, Dead Souls vol. 1 (1842) Chapters 5 and 6: pp. 88-132 Journal Entry #4: (prompt 1) (Goldberg 145) (prompt 2) (Goldberg 166

    Homework:
    • Read Gogol, Dead Souls vol. 1 (1842) Chapters 7 and 8: pp. 133-179
    • Study Guide:










    10/ 09
    Day 7
    Wed.





    10/ 10
    Day 8             Thurs.





    Chichikov dances as he dresses for the Governor's Ball.




    Review: What moments or images stand out from the novel in your imagination:
    • Chapter One: Chichikov's Arrival in the town of N.
      • Chichikov's Non-descript arrival
      • Muzhiks talking about the coach
      • "The Devil only knows
      • Little taciturn quiet man listening behind fortified door 
    • Chapter Two: His Visit to Landowner Manilov
      • Briddge never built
      • scummy pond
      • britzka writing the novel
      • sycophantic brown nosing of Manilov
      • Bald Philandering Chicken
    • Chapter Three: The Widow Korobochka
      • Chorus of dogs
      • Pig eating chick
      • feathers, scratched feet and inhaling flies, gobbling turkeys
      • scraps and nyons behind mirrors
      • nice peasant qurters, huge beautiful garden
    • Chapter Four: Nozdryov
      • Loses money while gambling and starwberrying at fair, as always
      • obsessive gambling and deal making
      • misic box screaching
      • puppy kisses
      • Chichikov about to be beaten with chibouk
    • Chapter Five: Sobakevich (dog)
      • convenient but unsymmetrical house
      •  rough hewn sturdy furniture "I am Sobakevich!"
      •  paintings of Greek generals over dinner table
      • rack of lamb vs. french fricassee
      • shrewd trader in dead souls
    • Chapter Six: Plyushkin
      • overgrown, huge Englsih garden with a tree struck by lightning: sad life story crushes him and turns him into a hoarder
      • dead fly blood ink used for contracts
      • piles of rotting grain that he won't sell
      • carrying bills to desk and putting them to bed
      • servant stole one piece of paper!
    Gogol, Dead Souls vol. 1 (1842) Chapters 7 and 8: pp. 133-179 Journal Entry #4: (prompt 1) (Goldberg 145) (prompt 2) (Goldberg 166) Journal Entry #5   (prompt 3)

    Homework:
    • Read Gogol, Dead Souls vol. 1 (1842) Chapters 9 and 10: pp. 180-220
    • Study Guide:










    10/ 11 Day 9
    Fri.





    10/ 14 Day 10          
    Mon.







    Gogol, Dead Souls vol. 1 (1842) Chapters 9 and 10: pp. 180-220

    Gossip Game: "I heard it through the grapevine."

    Luke 8:26-28 (King James Version) Jesus casts out the Devils.


    Homework:





    10/ 15 Day 1          
    Tues. READING DAY










    10/ 16 Day 2
    Wed.



    Gogol, Dead Souls vol. 1 (1842) Chapters 11: pp. 221-253 Creative Writing Assignment: Gogol's Style in Dead Souls










    10/

    17 Day 3
    Thurs.





    10/ 18 Day 4           Fri.



    Ivan Turgenev (1818-1883)

    Dead Souls Writing Assignment due at 3:30 p.m.

    Historical Backgrounds: 19th Century Overview: Part One; Part Two (notes)

    Turgenev, "A Country Doctor" from The Hunting Sketches (1855) (Discussion)

    Homework:










    10/ 21 Day 5
    Mon.





    10/ 22 Day 6           Tues.



    Repin, Barge Haulers on the Volga  (1870)


    KramskoyThe Peasant Ignatii Pirogov (1874)


    Google Docs Essay Project:

    Homework:

    Turgenev, Fathers & Sons, Chapters 1-10 (Study Guide) (discussion)

    For further reading:











    10/ 23 Day 7         Wed.





    10/

    24 Day 8
    Thurs.


    Pavlishchev Bor was built in the 18th century

    "Autumn" Mariia Konstantinovna Bashkirtseva (1858-1884)

    Turgenev, Fathers & Sons, Chapters 1-10 (Study Guide) (Discussion 1)

    Essay Due  Wednesday, November 6th by 3:30 p.m.

    Homework:

    Turgenev, Fathers & Sons, Chapters 11-18 ;Googledocs Text (47-86)

     






    10/
    25
    Day 9
    Fri.






    10/ 28 Day 10
    Mon.



    "Spring Flood" (1897) Isaak Levitan

    Essay Due  Wednesday, November 6th by 3:30 p.m.
    Turgenev, Fathers & Sons, Chapters 11-18  (Discussion 2)

    Homework:

    Turgenev, Fathers & Sons, Chapters 19-28 (Essay Assignment)

     

    10/ 29 Day 1
    Tues. READING DAY





    10/ 30 Day 2          Wed.



    "The Prose of Life" Baksheev

    Turgenev, Fathers & Sons, Chapters 1-10 (Discussion 1)
    Turgenev, Fathers & Sons, Chapters 11-18  (Discussion 2)
    Turgenev, Fathers & Sons, Chapters 19-28 (Discussion 3)
    (Essay Assignment)

    Homework:

    Turgenev Essay due Wednesday by 3:30 p.m.





    10/ 31 Day 3
    Thurs.





    11/

    01 Day 4
    Fri. 1/2 DAY CLASSES




    Essay Workshop





    11/ 04 Day 0           Mon AIMS DAY CONFERENCE





    11/ 05 Day 5
    Tues.





    11/ 06 Day 6             Wed.



    Perov, Portrait of the Author Feodor Dostoyevsky (1872)

    Turgenev Essay due by 3:30 pm

    Introduction to Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment

    Dostoevsky, "The Parable of the Grand Inquisitor" (1879) (Lesson Plan) (GLA Lesson Plan 2015)

    Homework:

     

    11/

    07 Day 7            Thurs.





    11/ 08 Day 8
    Fri..



    The Haymarket District in St. Petursburg, the poorest district in the city.  (Mapping St. Petersburg: Crime and Punishment part one)

    1897 Map of St. Petersburg


    Riis, Bandit's Roost (1888)



    Introduction to Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment

    The Clash of Ideas in Crime and Punishment:

    Westernizer

    Slavophile

    Socialist
    Radical Liberal
    Classical Liberal
    Proto-Fascist

    Socialist

    Conservative

    Old Believer








    • Socialism (rational self-interest)
    • Classical Liberal Theory (philanthropy)
    • Radical Liberal Theory (utilitarianism)
    • Nihilism (the proto- Fascist Superman)
    • Russian Reason (Radical Slavophile)
    • Conservative 'Sensualism' (The Cleopatra Syndrome)
    • Old Believer Submission
    Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, part one Chapters 1-4 (discussion)

    Chapter One:  The Threshold
    Chapter Two:  Marmeladov’s Aria
    Chapter Three: Pulcheria’s Letter
    Chapter Four:  Raskolnikov Rejects Dounia’s Sacrifice

    Homework:

    Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, part one Chapters 5- 7; Part Two  Chapter 1
    11/ 11 Day 9
    Mon.










    11/ 12 Day 10             Tues.



    The Stairway to the Pawnbroker's Apartment


    Marmeladov

    Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, part one (discussion)

    Chapter One:  The Threshold
    Chapter Two:  Marmeladov’s Aria
    Chapter Three: Pulcheria’s Letter
    Chapter Four:  Raskolnikov Rejects Dounia’s Sacrifice

    Chapter Five:  Raskolnikov’s Terrible Dream
    Chapter Six:  The Idea of Murder
    Chapter Seven: Across the Threshold

    Homework:

    • Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, part two (87-193)
    11/ 13 Day 1     Wed. READING DAY





    11/

    14 Day 2      
    Thurs.










    Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, part two (pp. 89-192) Discussion: Deciding Raskolnikov's Guilt using Aritotle's Nicomachaean Ethics as a Guide
    • Chart the sequence of action from Raskolnikov's narrow escape from the scence of the double murder to the arrival of Luzhin (143).
    • So how does it all sound to you? That's the sequence of events.
    • Does his behavior display 'intention, knowledge, and volition'? 
    • Hah! What conscious volition if any is directing his movements?
    • If Raskolnikov is not in  control of his actions, then what is?  St. Petersburg? Or is there another drama playing out beneath the surface of Raskolnikov's conscious thought?
    • Guilty or Not Guilty? You play lawyers.
    Homework:
    • Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, part two (87-193)
    For further reading:





    11/ 15 Day 3           
    Fri.





    11/ 18 Day 4         
    Mon.



    Haymarket Nocturne




    Sonia Marmeladov



    Westernizers
    Slavophiles
    Socialist Radical Liberal Classical Liberal Proto-Fascist Socialist Conservative Old Believer








    Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, part two (pp. 89-192) Homework:
    • Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, part three: chapters 1-4 (197-248)
    11/ 19
    Day 5
    Tues.





    11/ 20 Day 6
    Wed.





    Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, part three

    Homework:

    Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, part three
    Chapters 5-6 (249-281)

    11/

    21 Day 7        
    Thurs.





    11/ 22 Day 8           Fri.





    Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, part three

    Homework:

    Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, part four (281-358)

     






    11/ 25 Day 9
    Mon.





    11/

    26 Day 10           Tues.




    Rembrandt, The Raising of Lazarus (1630-32)
     
    “I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live: And whosoever liveth and believeth in me shall never die.”  Gospel of John,  Chapter 11

    Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, part four (281-358)

    Homework:

    Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, part five (361-438)
     





    11/ 27 Day 0 Wed. THANKSGIVING BREAK





    12/ 02
    Day 1
    Mon. READING DAY





    12/ 03 Day 2   Tues.





    Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, part five

    Homework:

    Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, part six (438-532)

     






    12/ 04 Day 3
    Wed.





    12/ 05 Day 4          Thurs.







    Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, part six
    Epilogue: Lazarus Raised (532-551)

    Homework:

    Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, part six and epilogue (437-551)
    12/ 06 Day 5          Fri.





    12/

    09
    Day 6         Mon.






    Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, part six
    Epilogue: Lazarus Raised (532-551)

    Homework:

    Dostoevsky Essay due Friday at 3:30 p.m.
    12/ 10 Day 7     Tues.





    12/ 11
    Day 8    
    Wed.  ESSAY WORKSHOP





    12/ 12 Day 9 Thurs.





    12/ 13 Day 10
    Fri.




    Sergei Nechaev (1847-1882)

    The Case of Vera Zasulich  (1878) Friend of Nechaev, in 1877 Vera Zasulich shot the police chief of St. Petersburg in reprisal for his beating  of a political prisoner in custody in the Peter and Paul Prison. In 1878, she was tried for the crime and acquitted (!)


    Dostoevsky essay due at 3:30 p.m.

    Nechaev, "Catechism of a Revolutionist" (1869) (discussion)

    Aileen Kelly, “Mr. Possessed” (on Sergei Nechaev) (1981): "The Revolutionary Catechism is to modern extremism what the Communist Manifesto is to communism.")

    Homework:

    Read:

    Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy (1828-1910)
    Tolstoy, The Death of Ivan Ilych (1886) (chapters one to five) (pp. 35-92)

    Figes, Chapter 5.   "In Search of the Russian Soul"
    5. Tolstoy vs. Chekhov on Faith and Death

    12/ 16 Day 1 Mon. READING DAY





    12/

    17 Day 2
    Tues.






    Tolstoy, The Death of Ivan Ilych (1886) (Notes)

    Chapter One:  Ivan Ilych's Funeral (35-48) (Notes)
    Chapter Two: Ivan's Youth and Early Adulthood (49-60) (Notes)
    Chapter Three: The Crisis of Ivan's Career (61-71) (Notes)
    Chapter Four: The Descent (73-83) (Notes)
    Chapter Five: Recognition (85-92) (Notes)
    Chapter Six: Memory (93-97) (Notes)
    Chapter Seven: Comfort (98-105) (Notes)
    Chapter Eight: A Day in the Death (107-116) (Notes)
    Chapter Nine: Opium Dream (117- 120) (Notes)
    Chapter Ten: Answers (121-124) (Notes)
    Chapter Eleven: Moral Agony (126-129) (Notes)
    Chapter Twelve: Death Throes (130-133) (Notes)

    Homework:

    Read Tolstoy, The Death of Ivan Ilych (1886)  (chapters six to twelve) (pp. 93- 134)

     






    12/ 18 Day 3
    Wed.





    12/ 19
    Day 4
    Thurs.






    Tolstoy, The Death of Ivan Ilych (1886) (Notes)

    Chapter One:  Ivan Ilych's Funeral (35-48) (Notes)
    Chapter Two: Ivan's Youth and Early Adulthood (49-60) (Notes)
    Chapter Three: The Crisis of Ivan's Career (61-71) (Notes)
    Chapter Four: The Descent (73-83) (Notes)
    Chapter Five: Recognition (85-92) (Notes)
    Chapter Six: Memory (93-97) (Notes)
    Chapter Seven: Comfort (98-105) (Notes)
    Chapter Eight: A Day in the Death (107-116) (Notes)
    Chapter Nine: Opium Dream (117- 120) (Notes)
    Chapter Ten: Answers (121-124) (Notes)
    Chapter Eleven: Moral Agony (126-129) (Notes)
    Chapter Twelve: Death Throes (130-133) (Notes)

    Homework:

    Chekhov, "Peasants" (1897) (Biographical Sketch) (Notes)
    12/ 20 Day 5
    Fri.





    12/
    21
    Day 0

    Winter Break





    1/ 06 Day 6           Mon.



    Anton Chekhov (1860-1904)


    Tolstoy and Chekhov

    Anton Chekhov (1860-1904)
    Chekhov, "Peasants" (1897)   (Notes)

    For further reading:

    The Conservative Reaction:
    1/ 07 Day 7
    Tues.





    1/ 08 Day 8
    Wed.





    Russian Peasant Village



    Chekhov, "Peasants" (1897) (Biographical Sketch) (Notes)

    For further reading:

    Homework:

    1/ 09 Day 9
    Thurs.





    1/

    10 Day 10
    Fri.




    Chekhov, "The Darling" (1899) (Notes)
    19th Century Review: (notes)

    For further reading:

    Homework:
    Chekhov,  In the Ravine (1900)
    1/ 13 Day 1
    Mon.





    1/ 14 Day 2
    Tues. REVIEW DAY





    Chekhov,  In the Ravine (1900)  (Discussion)

    Homework:

    • Essay on Tolstoy and Chekhov due at Exam Time

     

    1/ 15 Day 3
    Wed.





    1/ 16 Day 4
    Thurs. REVIEW DAY





    1/ 17 Day 5
    Fri. READING DAY





    1/

    20 Day 0  Mon. School Closed (MLK Day)





    1/ 21 Day 6 Tues. EXAMS





    1/ 22 Day 7  Wed EXAMS





    1/ 23 Day 8
    Thurs.

    EXAMS






    1/ 24 Day 9
    Fri.

    EXAMS





              

    1/

    27 Day 10     Mon.

    EXAMS Make Up Day           






    1/ 28 Day 1
    Tues.

    US Second Semester Begins